For How Long Should I Brush?

Even if you brush your teeth two or three times a day, the amount of time you spend doing it determines just how clean your teeth and gums really are. Dentists typically agree that to be effective, each session of toothbrushing should be at least two to five minutes. If you were to time your average toothbrushing session, do you think you’d hit even two minutes? Most Americans don’t.  

How to Reach the Two to Five Minute Brushing Mark

Two to five minutes can feel like an eternity when you’re late for work, dead tired at night, or have little ones squirming around the toothbrush. However, two to five-minute brushing sessions really are worth it. Think about it this way: spending 30 seconds brushing your teeth is like dusting your house while spending the appropriate 2-5 minutes is like sweeping and vacuuming and mopping. We need more than just 30 seconds to get rid of all the "dust bunnies" - otherwise, you're just moving them around in the harder to reach areas!

Here are a few tips to help you reach the two to five-minute brushing mark:

To learn more about proper brushing techniques, schedule a consultation with Dr. Hsu and his team. Besides hitting that two to five-minute mark, we can teach you how to effectively brush your teeth. We start by using a red dye that discloses invisible plaque buildup and shows you how to brush it away. We will also do a thorough examination of your oral health. Contact our office today to make an appointment!

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