To Floss or Not to Floss...

Flossing your teeth has always been an important step when it comes to dental hygiene, but reports have been saying over the past couple of years that people don’t need to floss as much - or at all. It's not hard these days to find an article that claims that the presumed benefits of flossing are overstated, or not even evident at all. On the other hand, some reports claim that flossing is really only effective when it comes to plaque removal. Still, others say that their findings, in fact, do promote the use of flossing to reduce problems such as bleeding gums.

Although flossing has never been officially studied, and henceforth, no real evidence has been accumulated to justify its need, The American Dental Association still avidly promotes flossing. In fact, they state that flossing “is an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums.”

Since 1979, the government has been claiming that flossing can help reduce dental problems such as gum disease. However, the latest issue of the federal government dietary guidelines does not include flossing as a requirement due to the lack of information supporting it effectiveness. 

So, who should you trust when it comes to deciding whether to floss or not to floss? The answer is simple. Listen to the expert, your dentist. Your dentist and hygienist see the results firsthand, every day. Despite the lack of official studies, the majority of care providers in the dental field see the answer to this quandary as common sense. If you were to use a red disclosing agent (like we at Wellness Centered Dentistry do at each hygiene visit), you would see the junk that is removed when flossing, and would need no further proof of its benefits!

Flossing is encouraged by Dr. Hsu and most dentists. One exception to the rule is young children who have lots of spacing between their teeth - making flossing difficult, and more of the tooth surface accessible by toothbrush than in the mouth of a healthy adult. Flossing is just one important step in daily hygiene grooming and is essential for keeping your teeth and gums healthy. Flossing yields long-term results that you will be grateful for. So, when considering the choice to floss or not, you have to decide: how important are your teeth and gums? 

For more information concerning your dental hygiene, please review our site, www.wellnesscentereddentistry.com, or give us a call at (425) 882-1354 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Hsu or Merry! 

Sources:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/a-big-problem-with-flossing/

http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/2016/08/03/Flossing-Controversy-Explained

http://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2016-archive/august/association-responds-to-news-story-challenging-benefits-of-dental-floss-use

http://drjsheehan.com/floss-not-floss/

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